Daze

21/08/2020

It’s been thrilling to see how Daze aka Benton Nuubian’s sound has morphed over the years, with acclaimed releases on LKR Records, Lobster Theremin, Pure Space, Unknown To The Unknown and his soon to be released album on Bizarro Records. Each release distinctly different, yet somehow each more captivating the last, Daze has crafted his own brand of techno that touches on EBM, bass, IDM and electro. ‘Complaints Department’ has undoubtedly allowed Daze the time and space to explore territory that to me sounds like his most personal creation yet. Driving and dark yet with ample finesse that allows the release to transgress the club and enter the realm of home listening.

I’ve also been a longstanding fan and listener of Daze’s DJ mixes – there’s something within them that resonates with me and I’m not sure whether it’s the diversity, depth or darkness that charms me most. In celebration of ‘Complaints Department’s’ imminent release, Daze broadcasts an hour of heady bass tinged greatness live on PBS Melbourne for Passing Notes episode 77.

Daze Interview

Penny: Your productions have weaved through much territory in terms of style over the years. This is also reflected in the breadth of sound crafted into your DJ mixes. ‘Complaints Department’, your debut album on Bizarro presents something new again. I get the sense that as time moves forward, each of your releases presents a truer sense of ‘you’ within them. Can you take me through your thoughts on this? 

 

Daze: That feels fairly accurate. It think given my releases have ended up being fairly spread out since people first heard from me out has meant that the music has maybe sounded a bit different each time. My tastes, listening preferences and ways of consuming music have continued to evolve, so inevitably I think my sound has too, but it still retains the dirt, so to speak. Moving forward, I’m looking to self release a lot more music via Bandcamp, so people may see less of a change in my style in future, or maybe they will – who knows. When it comes to mixes, they’ve also changed a little over time, as has what I conceptualise ‘club music’ to be, the boundaries of which have expanded far more than I would have thought in the past few years. I’m looking forward to playing to dance floors again, because I feel like I’ve got much wider arsenal of tracks to play. Clearing floors in a club near you again, soon.

 

Penny: Often working on an album allows artists space and time to explore unknown territory. How does crafting an album compare to making more individualised tracks or Eps? How was the creative process of working on an album for you?

 

Daze: This came about as an album rather unintentionally, we’d originally looked at doing a couple of shorter 12’s, and so the tracks on the record weren’t necessarily made with an album in mind – they were however made with a similar process and over a distinct period of time, and I think they’ve packaged up nicely. I’ve often thought recently to myself, how would I have gone if I’d known I was working on an album from scratch? The answer wasn’t clear, I’m thinking I’d probably just procrastinate for ages trying to work out how to go about it – so I’m now really confident this has been a blessing in disguise for me.

 

Penny: I’m a longstanding fan of your DJ mixes. There’s something about them that really resonates with me – i’m not sure whether it’s the diversity, depth or darkness. What does crafting a mix mean to you?

 

Daze: For me it’s just about trying to deliver whatever I’m enjoying at the time in a listenable format – it’s not important to try to make it sound like a set in a venue might. I definitely favour a darker palette of sounds, and that’s been reflected in my tastes as far back as I can remember

 

Penny: How does DJing (or lack thereof at the moment) shape your world inside the studio?

 

Daze: It doesn’t at all – I’ve never had a heavy schedule of shows outside of a few periods between 2014-2017, so I’ve always looked at the process of making music in isolation from the performative aspect.


Penny: Speaking of your studio, I’m interested in your set up. Take me through a couple of your must have pieces of gear.

Daze: For me, it’s the MPC first, with Ableton a close second. I’ve always had an MPC of some kind since the beginning, and the workflow is second nature. I’ve moved along the MPC line over time, so it began with the 1000 to now where I’m working with the MPC live, which has both its novel additions but its own drawbacks from the older units, which I miss. I used to be fairly gear heavy, but over time I ended up stripping it right back (I’m sure plenty of people have shared a similar journey). It just didn’t feel practical to have lots of gear lying around, and more recently I’ve fallen back in love with the idea of being able to record stuff into the computer, then save it and come back to it as it was sometime down the line, hence my nod to Ableton, which I’ve also used from the start. I’m spending more time now arranging/re-arranging tunes, whereas I used to just jam them to tape.

 

Penny: Having a career as an artist has taken you all over the world, with tours and time also living abroad. I still remember seeing you on a Berghain line up somewhere between Shackleton and Silent Servant! How has the traveling life treated you and what has it meant for your music? 

 

Daze: I’ve been really lucky to have been able to tour my music and have played in some amazing places, Cairo and Tblisi both stick out to me as spots I’d love to return to again. Touring and playing parties is such a cool, but isolating and weird experience. I only ever did it for periods of time, I think up to a few months max, but was always so happy to get home. One time Elastic Artists went into administration mid tour which totally sucked, but outside of that just hanging out listening to music with like minded humans and eating exotic food – what’s not to like?

 

Penny: I hear you’re back in Ballarat at the moment, undoubtedly a step back from the fast lane that many of us are experiencing at the moment. How’s life for you back in your hometown?

 

Daze: Ballarat’s just my adopted home town, I moved here from a little town in northern Vic when I was 17. Its cool though cause compared to the city it’s really cheap, and I’m liking Ballarat even better now that there’s no parties on in the city cause I don’t get any FOMO.

Daze

21/08/2020

It’s been thrilling to see how Daze aka Benton Nuubian’s sound has morphed over the years, with acclaimed releases on LKR Records, Lobster Theremin, Pure Space, Unknown To The Unknown and his soon to be released album on Bizarro Records. Each release distinctly different, yet somehow each more captivating the last, Daze has crafted his own brand of techno that touches on EBM, bass, IDM and electro. ‘Complaints Department’ has undoubtedly allowed Daze the time and space to explore territory that to me sounds like his most personal creation yet. Driving and dark yet with ample finesse that allows the release to transgress the club and enter the realm of home listening.

I’ve also been a longstanding fan and listener of Daze’s DJ mixes – there’s something within them that resonates with me and I’m not sure whether it’s the diversity, depth or darkness that charms me most. In celebration of ‘Complaints Department’s’ imminent release, Daze broadcasts an hour of heady bass tinged greatness live on PBS Melbourne for Passing Notes episode 77.

Daze Interview

Penny: Your productions have weaved through much territory in terms of style over the years. This is also reflected in the breadth of sound crafted into your DJ mixes. ‘Complaints Department’, your debut album on Bizarro presents something new again. I get the sense that as time moves forward, each of your releases presents a truer sense of ‘you’ within them. Can you take me through your thoughts on this? 

 

Daze: That feels fairly accurate. It think given my releases have ended up being fairly spread out since people first heard from me out has meant that the music has maybe sounded a bit different each time. My tastes, listening preferences and ways of consuming music have continued to evolve, so inevitably I think my sound has too, but it still retains the dirt, so to speak. Moving forward, I’m looking to self release a lot more music via Bandcamp, so people may see less of a change in my style in future, or maybe they will – who knows. When it comes to mixes, they’ve also changed a little over time, as has what I conceptualise ‘club music’ to be, the boundaries of which have expanded far more than I would have thought in the past few years. I’m looking forward to playing to dance floors again, because I feel like I’ve got much wider arsenal of tracks to play. Clearing floors in a club near you again, soon.

 

Penny: Often working on an album allows artists space and time to explore unknown territory. How does crafting an album compare to making more individualised tracks or Eps? How was the creative process of working on an album for you?

 

Daze: This came about as an album rather unintentionally, we’d originally looked at doing a couple of shorter 12’s, and so the tracks on the record weren’t necessarily made with an album in mind – they were however made with a similar process and over a distinct period of time, and I think they’ve packaged up nicely. I’ve often thought recently to myself, how would I have gone if I’d known I was working on an album from scratch? The answer wasn’t clear, I’m thinking I’d probably just procrastinate for ages trying to work out how to go about it – so I’m now really confident this has been a blessing in disguise for me.

 

Penny: I’m a longstanding fan of your DJ mixes. There’s something about them that really resonates with me – i’m not sure whether it’s the diversity, depth or darkness. What does crafting a mix mean to you?

 

Daze: For me it’s just about trying to deliver whatever I’m enjoying at the time in a listenable format – it’s not important to try to make it sound like a set in a venue might. I definitely favour a darker palette of sounds, and that’s been reflected in my tastes as far back as I can remember

 

Penny: How does DJing (or lack thereof at the moment) shape your world inside the studio?

 

Daze: It doesn’t at all – I’ve never had a heavy schedule of shows outside of a few periods between 2014-2017, so I’ve always looked at the process of making music in isolation from the performative aspect.


Penny: Speaking of your studio, I’m interested in your set up. Take me through a couple of your must have pieces of gear.

Daze: For me, it’s the MPC first, with Ableton a close second. I’ve always had an MPC of some kind since the beginning, and the workflow is second nature. I’ve moved along the MPC line over time, so it began with the 1000 to now where I’m working with the MPC live, which has both its novel additions but its own drawbacks from the older units, which I miss. I used to be fairly gear heavy, but over time I ended up stripping it right back (I’m sure plenty of people have shared a similar journey). It just didn’t feel practical to have lots of gear lying around, and more recently I’ve fallen back in love with the idea of being able to record stuff into the computer, then save it and come back to it as it was sometime down the line, hence my nod to Ableton, which I’ve also used from the start. I’m spending more time now arranging/re-arranging tunes, whereas I used to just jam them to tape.

 

Penny: Having a career as an artist has taken you all over the world, with tours and time also living abroad. I still remember seeing you on a Berghain line up somewhere between Shackleton and Silent Servant! How has the traveling life treated you and what has it meant for your music? 

 

Daze: I’ve been really lucky to have been able to tour my music and have played in some amazing places, Cairo and Tblisi both stick out to me as spots I’d love to return to again. Touring and playing parties is such a cool, but isolating and weird experience. I only ever did it for periods of time, I think up to a few months max, but was always so happy to get home. One time Elastic Artists went into administration mid tour which totally sucked, but outside of that just hanging out listening to music with like minded humans and eating exotic food – what’s not to like?

 

Penny: I hear you’re back in Ballarat at the moment, undoubtedly a step back from the fast lane that many of us are experiencing at the moment. How’s life for you back in your hometown?

 

Daze: Ballarat’s just my adopted home town, I moved here from a little town in northern Vic when I was 17. Its cool though cause compared to the city it’s really cheap, and I’m liking Ballarat even better now that there’s no parties on in the city cause I don’t get any FOMO.