Ivy aka IV Drip

12/03/2021

Seeing the interstate circuit beginning to turn in Melbourne means the return of one of Sydney’s stalwart DJs, IV Drip. Ivy is radio host (Nomad Radio), events organiser (Headroom), expert mix curator (NTS, Animalia) and critical fixture in the Nectar family. Inherent to being part of the Nectar crew, is their commitment movement toward gender equality in the electronic music community. Ivy’s commitment to her community shines both on and off the stage – always tinkering away and bringing multiple creative projects to life, she’s undoubtedly drawn to creating spaces that keep Sydney’s nightlight alive. Beyond her backstage prowess, Ivy and IV Drip’s mixes have always left me floored. Luckily her in demand skills as a DJ and artist have landed her an ongoing slot on Nomad radio, where she has recently transitioned from presenting her show ‘Thanks for Sharing’ to newly founded ‘Home Time’ where she explores Australian music bounded by no sound. Ivy joined Darcy Justice and myself for IWD X 2 Years Passing Notes, a double header line up which is becoming ritual for this annual celebration. 

 

Ivy Interview

Penny: Happy International Women’s Day and a heartfelt thank-you for helping me celebrate the 2-year anniversary of Passing Notes. You and your Nectar family have had a significant impact on bringing gender equality to the fore in Sydney’s underground electronic community. Can you tell the PBS listeners about any Sydney based femme/gnc artists that are a must hear right now?

Ivy: Thank you for having me! I’m a big fan of the show and was honoured to be asked to contribute a mix. Some faves of mine at the moment/ of all time are DJ Off It (jobfit), crescendoll, Natalia, Merph, Giulia, con pani, DJ Scorpion, index + Bocconcini.

Penny: It gives me great joy to see the interstate circuit beginning to turn. Lucky for us in Melbourne, you’ll be playing amongst an all star cast including Menage and Citizen Maze at the upcoming Resonet party. What does it mean to you, to be able tour and perform interstate again? 

Ivy: This probably sounds super cheesy but it actually means a hell of a lot! Not only will this gig be pretty much the first time I’ve DJ’d to a dance floor, it will actually be the first time I’ve stepped foot in a club for about a year. More than anything I’m excited to just be at a party, and being able to play alongside some of my favourite DJs/ live acts from Naarm/ Melbourne is a huge cherry on top. I’m not exaggerating when I say that leading up to the gig I’ve teared up at the thought of being on a dancefloor – I’m incredibly grateful that I was asked to come down and play and I hope I get to do it again soon. 

Penny: Helmed by yourself and Nat James, Headroom has been throwing parties and hosting tours in Sydney, focusing on all things heavy, bass and experimental. Aside from Headroom, IV Drip seems to be behind the scenes, tinkering away bringing many creative projects to life. What draws you to creating spaces that keep the Sydney nightlife and electronic music scene alive? 

Ivy: I definitely think the desire to create spaces to enjoy the music we love has come from what Eora/ Sydney lacks due to the lockout laws. I’m pretty over talking about the lockout laws, but it definitely pushed a lot of people (Nat and myself included) to throw their own parties in warehouses and other DIY spaces in order to experience the electronic music scene the way they want to. It’s definitely challenging, but I’m constantly motivated by those in the Eora/ Sydney scene who push boundaries and put in endless amounts of effort to create safe, inclusive and inspiring events and projects – shoutouts to Echo Flats, Tactic, Nectar and Third Space just to name a few. Hopefully it’s not too long until these events can happen again, and I can’t wait to see what new crews/ parties pop up on the other side of these restrictions.

Penny: Despite the current lack of events in Sydney, you’ve been skilfully creating inspiring mixes for multiple platforms, including your newly established radio ‘Home Time’ which is housed through online radio platform Nomad Radio. Where do you draw your musical inspiration from in the absence of many of your ongoing creative outlets?

Ivy: My musical inspiration definitely comes from my friends and family. I’d say the foundations of my music taste and style is heavily based on what my parents would play on long drives and around the house – they didn’t listen to electronic music, but I still think their taste has influenced the way I listen to it and I think that really shows in the mixes I make that aren’t for the club.

When it comes to dance music, I find it tricky to feel inspired when I’m not able to experience it on a dancefloor and on a big soundsystem, but listening to and sharing music with friends keeps me motivated and excited for when we can finally have events in Eora/ Sydney again. Other than that, listening to recordings of my favourite sets from things like Inner Varnika and Echo Flats is always a good pick-me-up when I’m feeling a bit lost and unmotivated. 

Penny: Can you tell us about the transition from your previous Nomad show, Thanks For Sharing, to ‘Home Time’? 

Ivy: I was getting a bit stressed each month figuring out what to play for Thanks For Sharing as the vibe of the show was so broad, and when we went into lockdown I spent a lot of time listening to so much amazing music coming out of Australia (both new and old) so I figured that a show comprising of all-Australian releases would be a good way for me to set a boundary but still be able to play whatever I want. Nomad Radio also didn’t have an Australian music show so I thought I’d fill that gap with Home Time – I do miss Thanks For Sharing, and I didn’t realise I would get so many messages from people who were sad to see it end! Who knows – I may revive it in the future but that’s very TBC!

Penny: Beyond your commitment to sharing Australian music, what is your vision for Home Time?

Ivy: To be honest I haven’t really thought about it since Nomad went on a hiatus last year, but the good news is that they’re re-launching very soon! My favourite thing about doing Home Time is that it gives me motivation to look into so many incredible artists and labels that I may not have found otherwise. When I get back into it I’m keen to do some specific label-focussed episodes, as well as highlight some of the phenomenal indie rock scene that Australia had in the 1990s. 

Penny: What are you looking forward to in the future of IV Drip and Ivy?

Ivy: Mostly I’m looking forward to the restrictions easing in Eora/ Sydney soon (fingers crossed!) so I can play/ dance again! I can’t wait until the next Community Chest – a 15-hour party at The Bridge Hotel run by a bunch of local crews; Nectar, Umami, Eureka, Vibe Positive, Heavenly, Moonshoe & Headroom, I can’t put into words how ecstatic I’ll be when we can finally lock in the next one. 

Aside from that I’m looking forward to hopefully coming down to Melbourne again soon, plus I also have a few mixes on my to-do list that I’m really excited to record!

-END-

Ivy aka IV Drip

12/03/2021

Seeing the interstate circuit beginning to turn in Melbourne means the return of one of Sydney’s stalwart DJs, IV Drip. Ivy is radio host (Nomad Radio), events organiser (Headroom), expert mix curator (NTS, Animalia) and critical fixture in the Nectar family. Inherent to being part of the Nectar crew, is their commitment movement toward gender equality in the electronic music community. Ivy’s commitment to her community shines both on and off the stage – always tinkering away and bringing multiple creative projects to life, she’s undoubtedly drawn to creating spaces that keep Sydney’s nightlight alive. Beyond her backstage prowess, Ivy and IV Drip’s mixes have always left me floored. Luckily her in demand skills as a DJ and artist have landed her an ongoing slot on Nomad radio, where she has recently transitioned from presenting her show ‘Thanks for Sharing’ to newly founded ‘Home Time’ where she explores Australian music bounded by no sound. Ivy joined Darcy Justice and myself for IWD X 2 Years Passing Notes, a double header line up which is becoming ritual for this annual celebration. 

 

Ivy Interview

Penny: Happy International Women’s Day and a heartfelt thank-you for helping me celebrate the 2-year anniversary of Passing Notes. You and your Nectar family have had a significant impact on bringing gender equality to the fore in Sydney’s underground electronic community. Can you tell the PBS listeners about any Sydney based femme/gnc artists that are a must hear right now?

Ivy: Thank you for having me! I’m a big fan of the show and was honoured to be asked to contribute a mix. Some faves of mine at the moment/ of all time are DJ Off It (jobfit), crescendoll, Natalia, Merph, Giulia, con pani, DJ Scorpion, index + Bocconcini.

Penny: It gives me great joy to see the interstate circuit beginning to turn. Lucky for us in Melbourne, you’ll be playing amongst an all star cast including Menage and Citizen Maze at the upcoming Resonet party. What does it mean to you, to be able tour and perform interstate again? 

Ivy: This probably sounds super cheesy but it actually means a hell of a lot! Not only will this gig be pretty much the first time I’ve DJ’d to a dance floor, it will actually be the first time I’ve stepped foot in a club for about a year. More than anything I’m excited to just be at a party, and being able to play alongside some of my favourite DJs/ live acts from Naarm/ Melbourne is a huge cherry on top. I’m not exaggerating when I say that leading up to the gig I’ve teared up at the thought of being on a dancefloor – I’m incredibly grateful that I was asked to come down and play and I hope I get to do it again soon. 

Penny: Helmed by yourself and Nat James, Headroom has been throwing parties and hosting tours in Sydney, focusing on all things heavy, bass and experimental. Aside from Headroom, IV Drip seems to be behind the scenes, tinkering away bringing many creative projects to life. What draws you to creating spaces that keep the Sydney nightlife and electronic music scene alive? 

Ivy: I definitely think the desire to create spaces to enjoy the music we love has come from what Eora/ Sydney lacks due to the lockout laws. I’m pretty over talking about the lockout laws, but it definitely pushed a lot of people (Nat and myself included) to throw their own parties in warehouses and other DIY spaces in order to experience the electronic music scene the way they want to. It’s definitely challenging, but I’m constantly motivated by those in the Eora/ Sydney scene who push boundaries and put in endless amounts of effort to create safe, inclusive and inspiring events and projects – shoutouts to Echo Flats, Tactic, Nectar and Third Space just to name a few. Hopefully it’s not too long until these events can happen again, and I can’t wait to see what new crews/ parties pop up on the other side of these restrictions.

Penny: Despite the current lack of events in Sydney, you’ve been skilfully creating inspiring mixes for multiple platforms, including your newly established radio ‘Home Time’ which is housed through online radio platform Nomad Radio. Where do you draw your musical inspiration from in the absence of many of your ongoing creative outlets?

Ivy: My musical inspiration definitely comes from my friends and family. I’d say the foundations of my music taste and style is heavily based on what my parents would play on long drives and around the house – they didn’t listen to electronic music, but I still think their taste has influenced the way I listen to it and I think that really shows in the mixes I make that aren’t for the club.

When it comes to dance music, I find it tricky to feel inspired when I’m not able to experience it on a dancefloor and on a big soundsystem, but listening to and sharing music with friends keeps me motivated and excited for when we can finally have events in Eora/ Sydney again. Other than that, listening to recordings of my favourite sets from things like Inner Varnika and Echo Flats is always a good pick-me-up when I’m feeling a bit lost and unmotivated. 

Penny: Can you tell us about the transition from your previous Nomad show, Thanks For Sharing, to ‘Home Time’? 

Ivy: I was getting a bit stressed each month figuring out what to play for Thanks For Sharing as the vibe of the show was so broad, and when we went into lockdown I spent a lot of time listening to so much amazing music coming out of Australia (both new and old) so I figured that a show comprising of all-Australian releases would be a good way for me to set a boundary but still be able to play whatever I want. Nomad Radio also didn’t have an Australian music show so I thought I’d fill that gap with Home Time – I do miss Thanks For Sharing, and I didn’t realise I would get so many messages from people who were sad to see it end! Who knows – I may revive it in the future but that’s very TBC!

Penny: Beyond your commitment to sharing Australian music, what is your vision for Home Time?

Ivy: To be honest I haven’t really thought about it since Nomad went on a hiatus last year, but the good news is that they’re re-launching very soon! My favourite thing about doing Home Time is that it gives me motivation to look into so many incredible artists and labels that I may not have found otherwise. When I get back into it I’m keen to do some specific label-focussed episodes, as well as highlight some of the phenomenal indie rock scene that Australia had in the 1990s. 

Penny: What are you looking forward to in the future of IV Drip and Ivy?

Ivy: Mostly I’m looking forward to the restrictions easing in Eora/ Sydney soon (fingers crossed!) so I can play/ dance again! I can’t wait until the next Community Chest – a 15-hour party at The Bridge Hotel run by a bunch of local crews; Nectar, Umami, Eureka, Vibe Positive, Heavenly, Moonshoe & Headroom, I can’t put into words how ecstatic I’ll be when we can finally lock in the next one. 

Aside from that I’m looking forward to hopefully coming down to Melbourne again soon, plus I also have a few mixes on my to-do list that I’m really excited to record!

-END-