Low Flung

2020-07-31

To coincide with the release of his sophomore album ‘Outside the Circle’, Sydney’s Low Flung aka Danny Wild joined me on Passing Notes episode 74 as my first-ever repeat guest. Visual artist, Moontown Records boss, producer and DJ - I am yet to decide if it's Low Flung's incredibly unique productions or collection of digi dub 7"s that I envy most. With releases on Australian stalwart labels Butter Sessions and Ken Oath Records, Low Flung's newest addition on Paper-Cuts reveals a somewhat more serious side than that of Danny’s more playful debut album ‘Blow Waves’. Reflective of the world around, ‘Outside The Circle’ explores impressive variation that spans dance floor ready minimalism, eerie atmospheric ambiance and the inimitable Low Flung downtempo dub sound.  What is most remarkable about this release is that it is more than just an album. Released alongside a stunning series of visual clips, we are presented with an impressive creative package that we are beginning to know Paper-Cuts and its alluring aesthetic so well for. You can view the visuals on YouTube here. Here, Danny presents for us an exciting mix of original Low Flung compositions and collaborations: some unreleased, some forthcoming but all worthy of our attention. __Tracklist:__ Train Crossing in 2014 (Field Recording) Low Flung - Chipboard Low Flung - 871046 Subcell - Second Of The Two Low Flung - Lumbargo (Extended Mix) Mindleaf and Low Flung - Secret Recipe (Version) Low Flung - Untitled Low Flung - Matter Danny and Rhys - Live Improvisation (Excerpt) Picnic - Earth At Hidden Pond (with Low Flung) Low Flung - On A Leg -- __Low Flung Interview - Transcript__  __Penny:__ So firstly, congratulations on a fantastic release and this amazing creative package that has come with the album that you’re putting out today on Paper-Cuts. You’re also my first repeat guest so welcome back! How does that make you feel? __Low Flung:__ Very special! And very suited to the album as well, because it’s my second album. __Penny:__ I learnt through attending your Ableton tutorials - which as a side note I thought were absolutely great - that you’ve been making music for a very long time now, so about seven years if I remember correctly? __Low Flung:__ Yeah, it’s hard to take count I guess of how long, but definitely at least seven years. __Penny:__ I would consider your modular set up as very characteristic Low Flung, or characteristic of the ‘Low Flung sound’, so I was wondering over those seven years, can you describe to me that journey towards your modular set up and what drew you to it? __Low Flung:__ Yeah sure, I guess I’ve always had an interest in experimenting with music and in particular electronic music. I started out by getting whatever weird microphones I could find at the op shops and then keyboards, and guitar pedals and you know. I started experimenting with all different ways of making music and I guess that led me down path of finding out about sequencers…drum machines…samplers and using DAWs, like making music on a computer, and I think over time I just started to learn about modular synthesis and I was just really drawn to it – just the way that I can use it to improvise and make music is just, it just works with the way I make music. __Penny:__ That’s great. I think for myself and a lot of PBS listeners, the concept of modular synthesis is a little bit complex, so if you can, how would you describe modular synthesis in its simplest terms? __Low Flung:__ It’s definitely very daunting not knowing anything about it and not knowing where to start, because there are so many different modules, but I guess the way to look at it in its most simplest terms is kind of like Lego. Lego blocks for synthesizers, so you have a case and you fill it with your Lego blocks which are your different components, which all contribute to achieving what you want out of it. You can make it a synthesizer, or you can make a modular set up that is just effects, it can essentially be whatever you want it to be. __Penny:__ I guess that fits in really nicely with your sort of more experimental sound and your ability to play live sets? __Low Flung:__ Yeah for sure, I think for me with electronic music and live sets, a lot of the time you might see someone with a laptop and they can perform a perfect set and that’s really amazing but for me I think there’s more interest in the possibility of everything falling apart you know! At any second…that for me makes a live set in electronic music exciting. __Penny:__ That’s really interesting. Your last album ‘Blow Waves’ was on Ken Oath records and I can definitely say that was a favourite of mine. I know that ‘Outside The Circle’ will be receiving the same attention, but for me it was really interesting because ‘Blow Waves’ had quite a playful atmosphere and I though that ‘Outside the Circle’ seemed to explore, for lack of a better word, a more serious side or touches slightly on a darker side. Can you describe to me how you think that came about? __Low Flung:__ I think over the past two years a lot of quite difficult personal things have happened to me, to do with family and to do with even…the current state of the world and this kind of, decline which is happening everywhere. I think it’s just reflecting the times and just personal experience really. Which unfortunately has gotten, for lack of a better word, more serious. I think that’s the main thing, the current state of the world and politics and some personal experiences. __Penny:__ I do think that shines through and I wondered whether current political climate was one of the aspects of that. In the album I really love that there’s such variation in energy that happens across the album and the tracks span dancefloor ready cuts and eerie ambience and a kind of chugging downtempo dub sound somewhere in the middle, which is very quintessentially Low Flung, but I found the order of the tracks particularly interesting. The LP starts off with some of the higher energy tracks, which I found rather refreshing because I don’t think that is what usually happens, and I also think that it enhances the playability of the record from a DJ perspective. Can you run me through your reasoning for the order of the tracks? __Low Flung:__ Yeah sure, the tracks are so varied so it was always quite difficult to put them into some sort of cohesive order, but I think just as far as my thoughts go, I wanted to make the album flow a little less linear and a little bit less like an arc that goes from slow to some sort of full speed and back down again. I wanted to play around with that and create something a little bit more unsettling to listen to. Also, I feel the first side is a much more, I mean there are the dance tracks that sort of start it off and I feel like that side maybe could be used more for someone who would be DJing but then on the second side I feel is more for listening. I don’t know, I feel like people really don’t pay much attention to albums anymore so it’s kind of a subtle statement on that as well, just giving people what they want which is the dance music. __Penny:__ I thought there might be that cheeky undertone. __Low Flung:__ Get that out of the way you know? But it did take a long time and I’ve made countless variations on the playlist before I came up with this progression but I’m really happy with where it ended. __Penny:__ That’s great. Despite the variation throughout the album your music is always tied together by a sense of restraint or an undercurrent of minimalism and I think that really adds to your unique sound. We’ve previously talked a lot about our shared love for minimal, so why do you think you’re able to present such restraint within your productions? __Low Flung:__ I think in making music for me, you can get so much out of so little, and I like the sounds that I’ve made to breath and have enough space to have their own life and I feel like, with music, you don’t really need a lot going on to create something dynamic and interesting. I think for visual art and music I’m always drawn to restraint and minimalism, so I think it’s also my personal taste. __Penny:__ I really love that sentiment of letting sounds breath, I think that’s really nice. You did mention visual artwork and we did speak about this when you were on the show last time, but for this album you’ve created a series of clips to go with each track and they’ve been premiered with the album. You’ve also done a stellar job of the sleeve artwork. The clips really add to the release as a package, whilst also tying in really nicely with the aesthetic of the Paper-Cuts label. For those who don’t know, Paper-Cuts also works with a similar visual medium. Can you take us through the clips and how they were made? __Low Flung:__ I have a lot of respect for working with Paper-Cuts as a label and the aesthetic that exists within Dylan’s label, so working with him to create something it’s always good to be mindful of the aesthetic there, so I always had that in my mind. With creating the visuals, I made them with analogue video mixers and there’s also some scans, microscopic scans of objects, like paper bark that I’ve torn from a paper bark tree. I just wanted to create something that you can have on and you can view and listen to the album but not necessarily a music video or a focus. I guess it could be something that, if you wanted to listen to the album you could get the visualiser up and you could make it full screen and have on your computer at the same time. __Penny:__ Can listeners access the visuals as well? __Low Flung:__ Yeah, absolutely. It will be on the Paper-Cuts IGTV and it will also be up in full on my YouTube account so you can watch it there. I think it will be on Facebook as well, just trying to make it as accessible as possible I suppose. __Penny:__ What does it mean to you to be able to provide such an amazing visual backing to your LP? __Low Flung:__ It just creates a bit more of a full picture of an album. I’m one of those dorky people that talks about music having colour, so I just think having that existing as part of the album creates more of a full piece. __Penny:__ Last time I had you on the show I wasn’t at the point of publicly sharing guest mixes so I’m really excited to have you back so we can share what you’ve made for Passing Notes. I know this is a very special mix of your own productions so can you take us through the mix? __Low Flung:__ Yeah it is, I decided during the last mix that I made, that I don’t really want to focus on Djing anymore so much as much as my own music, so in being asked by you to create a mix the only really logical thing was to create a mix of original compositions so that’s what I’ve done. Made a mix of original music, unreleased stuff, a different version of a track from the album there’s also a number of collaborations on there, which I’m really excited about. So, it’s a mix of a few things that I’ve done recently, a few works in progress. __Penny:__ That’s awesome, I’m super excited to be airing the mix, Low Flung productions of his own and to be presenting you album ‘Outside the Circle’ which has been released today on Paper-Cuts.

Low Flung

2020-07-31

To coincide with the release of his sophomore album ‘Outside the Circle’, Sydney’s Low Flung aka Danny Wild joined me on Passing Notes episode 74 as my first-ever repeat guest. Visual artist, Moontown Records boss, producer and DJ - I am yet to decide if it's Low Flung's incredibly unique productions or collection of digi dub 7"s that I envy most. With releases on Australian stalwart labels Butter Sessions and Ken Oath Records, Low Flung's newest addition on Paper-Cuts reveals a somewhat more serious side than that of Danny’s more playful debut album ‘Blow Waves’. Reflective of the world around, ‘Outside The Circle’ explores impressive variation that spans dance floor ready minimalism, eerie atmospheric ambiance and the inimitable Low Flung downtempo dub sound.  What is most remarkable about this release is that it is more than just an album. Released alongside a stunning series of visual clips, we are presented with an impressive creative package that we are beginning to know Paper-Cuts and its alluring aesthetic so well for. You can view the visuals on YouTube here. Here, Danny presents for us an exciting mix of original Low Flung compositions and collaborations: some unreleased, some forthcoming but all worthy of our attention. __Tracklist:__ Train Crossing in 2014 (Field Recording) Low Flung - Chipboard Low Flung - 871046 Subcell - Second Of The Two Low Flung - Lumbargo (Extended Mix) Mindleaf and Low Flung - Secret Recipe (Version) Low Flung - Untitled Low Flung - Matter Danny and Rhys - Live Improvisation (Excerpt) Picnic - Earth At Hidden Pond (with Low Flung) Low Flung - On A Leg -- __Low Flung Interview - Transcript__  __Penny:__ So firstly, congratulations on a fantastic release and this amazing creative package that has come with the album that you’re putting out today on Paper-Cuts. You’re also my first repeat guest so welcome back! How does that make you feel? __Low Flung:__ Very special! And very suited to the album as well, because it’s my second album. __Penny:__ I learnt through attending your Ableton tutorials - which as a side note I thought were absolutely great - that you’ve been making music for a very long time now, so about seven years if I remember correctly? __Low Flung:__ Yeah, it’s hard to take count I guess of how long, but definitely at least seven years. __Penny:__ I would consider your modular set up as very characteristic Low Flung, or characteristic of the ‘Low Flung sound’, so I was wondering over those seven years, can you describe to me that journey towards your modular set up and what drew you to it? __Low Flung:__ Yeah sure, I guess I’ve always had an interest in experimenting with music and in particular electronic music. I started out by getting whatever weird microphones I could find at the op shops and then keyboards, and guitar pedals and you know. I started experimenting with all different ways of making music and I guess that led me down path of finding out about sequencers…drum machines…samplers and using DAWs, like making music on a computer, and I think over time I just started to learn about modular synthesis and I was just really drawn to it – just the way that I can use it to improvise and make music is just, it just works with the way I make music. __Penny:__ That’s great. I think for myself and a lot of PBS listeners, the concept of modular synthesis is a little bit complex, so if you can, how would you describe modular synthesis in its simplest terms? __Low Flung:__ It’s definitely very daunting not knowing anything about it and not knowing where to start, because there are so many different modules, but I guess the way to look at it in its most simplest terms is kind of like Lego. Lego blocks for synthesizers, so you have a case and you fill it with your Lego blocks which are your different components, which all contribute to achieving what you want out of it. You can make it a synthesizer, or you can make a modular set up that is just effects, it can essentially be whatever you want it to be. __Penny:__ I guess that fits in really nicely with your sort of more experimental sound and your ability to play live sets? __Low Flung:__ Yeah for sure, I think for me with electronic music and live sets, a lot of the time you might see someone with a laptop and they can perform a perfect set and that’s really amazing but for me I think there’s more interest in the possibility of everything falling apart you know! At any second…that for me makes a live set in electronic music exciting. __Penny:__ That’s really interesting. Your last album ‘Blow Waves’ was on Ken Oath records and I can definitely say that was a favourite of mine. I know that ‘Outside The Circle’ will be receiving the same attention, but for me it was really interesting because ‘Blow Waves’ had quite a playful atmosphere and I though that ‘Outside the Circle’ seemed to explore, for lack of a better word, a more serious side or touches slightly on a darker side. Can you describe to me how you think that came about? __Low Flung:__ I think over the past two years a lot of quite difficult personal things have happened to me, to do with family and to do with even…the current state of the world and this kind of, decline which is happening everywhere. I think it’s just reflecting the times and just personal experience really. Which unfortunately has gotten, for lack of a better word, more serious. I think that’s the main thing, the current state of the world and politics and some personal experiences. __Penny:__ I do think that shines through and I wondered whether current political climate was one of the aspects of that. In the album I really love that there’s such variation in energy that happens across the album and the tracks span dancefloor ready cuts and eerie ambience and a kind of chugging downtempo dub sound somewhere in the middle, which is very quintessentially Low Flung, but I found the order of the tracks particularly interesting. The LP starts off with some of the higher energy tracks, which I found rather refreshing because I don’t think that is what usually happens, and I also think that it enhances the playability of the record from a DJ perspective. Can you run me through your reasoning for the order of the tracks? __Low Flung:__ Yeah sure, the tracks are so varied so it was always quite difficult to put them into some sort of cohesive order, but I think just as far as my thoughts go, I wanted to make the album flow a little less linear and a little bit less like an arc that goes from slow to some sort of full speed and back down again. I wanted to play around with that and create something a little bit more unsettling to listen to. Also, I feel the first side is a much more, I mean there are the dance tracks that sort of start it off and I feel like that side maybe could be used more for someone who would be DJing but then on the second side I feel is more for listening. I don’t know, I feel like people really don’t pay much attention to albums anymore so it’s kind of a subtle statement on that as well, just giving people what they want which is the dance music. __Penny:__ I thought there might be that cheeky undertone. __Low Flung:__ Get that out of the way you know? But it did take a long time and I’ve made countless variations on the playlist before I came up with this progression but I’m really happy with where it ended. __Penny:__ That’s great. Despite the variation throughout the album your music is always tied together by a sense of restraint or an undercurrent of minimalism and I think that really adds to your unique sound. We’ve previously talked a lot about our shared love for minimal, so why do you think you’re able to present such restraint within your productions? __Low Flung:__ I think in making music for me, you can get so much out of so little, and I like the sounds that I’ve made to breath and have enough space to have their own life and I feel like, with music, you don’t really need a lot going on to create something dynamic and interesting. I think for visual art and music I’m always drawn to restraint and minimalism, so I think it’s also my personal taste. __Penny:__ I really love that sentiment of letting sounds breath, I think that’s really nice. You did mention visual artwork and we did speak about this when you were on the show last time, but for this album you’ve created a series of clips to go with each track and they’ve been premiered with the album. You’ve also done a stellar job of the sleeve artwork. The clips really add to the release as a package, whilst also tying in really nicely with the aesthetic of the Paper-Cuts label. For those who don’t know, Paper-Cuts also works with a similar visual medium. Can you take us through the clips and how they were made? __Low Flung:__ I have a lot of respect for working with Paper-Cuts as a label and the aesthetic that exists within Dylan’s label, so working with him to create something it’s always good to be mindful of the aesthetic there, so I always had that in my mind. With creating the visuals, I made them with analogue video mixers and there’s also some scans, microscopic scans of objects, like paper bark that I’ve torn from a paper bark tree. I just wanted to create something that you can have on and you can view and listen to the album but not necessarily a music video or a focus. I guess it could be something that, if you wanted to listen to the album you could get the visualiser up and you could make it full screen and have on your computer at the same time. __Penny:__ Can listeners access the visuals as well? __Low Flung:__ Yeah, absolutely. It will be on the Paper-Cuts IGTV and it will also be up in full on my YouTube account so you can watch it there. I think it will be on Facebook as well, just trying to make it as accessible as possible I suppose. __Penny:__ What does it mean to you to be able to provide such an amazing visual backing to your LP? __Low Flung:__ It just creates a bit more of a full picture of an album. I’m one of those dorky people that talks about music having colour, so I just think having that existing as part of the album creates more of a full piece. __Penny:__ Last time I had you on the show I wasn’t at the point of publicly sharing guest mixes so I’m really excited to have you back so we can share what you’ve made for Passing Notes. I know this is a very special mix of your own productions so can you take us through the mix? __Low Flung:__ Yeah it is, I decided during the last mix that I made, that I don’t really want to focus on Djing anymore so much as much as my own music, so in being asked by you to create a mix the only really logical thing was to create a mix of original compositions so that’s what I’ve done. Made a mix of original music, unreleased stuff, a different version of a track from the album there’s also a number of collaborations on there, which I’m really excited about. So, it’s a mix of a few things that I’ve done recently, a few works in progress. __Penny:__ That’s awesome, I’m super excited to be airing the mix, Low Flung productions of his own and to be presenting you album ‘Outside the Circle’ which has been released today on Paper-Cuts.